Meet Member Artists

Kim Ferguson

OCAC member, Kim Ferguson, grew up near Niagara Falls, NY. As a child she wasn’t comfortable in front of the camera, but as an adult she has found her comfort zone behind the camera! At a young age, Kim’s father taught her basic photography and gave her a camera, starting her lifelong journey of looking at life through a camera lens.

Kim has always been interested in art, nature, animals, architecture, and history. She finds abandoned buildings fascinating. She has photographed many abandoned houses over the years and often researches their histories. Some of her photos are a time frame of decay and many of theses images are all that remain of these buildings and homes. 

Kim says that Rod Serling and Stephen King have influenced her creepy doll series of photos in abandoned buildings!

Kim believes photographs tell many different stories if you take the time to see. Unless she’s exhibiting pictures in a show she prefers not to title them, leaving it up to people to interpret what they see.

Kim’s photos will be on display in her one-woman exhibit titled, Abandoned, Decay, and Ice, in the Fayad Gallery sponsored by Wayne County Council of the Arts, from September 2nd to October 2nd. The reception will be September 18th from 4 to 6pm. Kim can be contacted at: kswferguson@earthlink.net

Kim Ferguson.jpg

Kim’s photographs represent houses and places throughout NYS, ie: Catskill Game Farm, Silo City in Buffalo, various residences. Over the last five years Kim has taken a series of photos of Silo City in Buffalo, NY. She recently donated two photographs to the OCAC sponsored, Art in the Breweries fund raiser, which can be seen and bid on at the Birdhouse Brewery in Honeoye, NY.

Silo City Malt House, Buffalo, NY

Kim says that she tends to miss the bigger picture, instead focusing on the tiny details, or seeing things in―macro-mode, as she calls it. Naturally, macro photography has become her niche. She uses a Cannon EOS and usually uses an 18 - 400 zoom lens for her macro photography. While the bigger picture is great for landscapes and story telling, zooming in on objects can produce a whole new world. She enjoys seeing tiny galaxies, clouds, animals, and people in frozen puddles of ice, and abstract or sinister figures in rust and dust.